12 Days of Ambu-mas

I’m working Christmas this year, a lot of my colleagues are. Wether that be police, fire or ambulance (maybe even coastguard) as well as the NHS and all the other public and voluntary sector workers.

It can be demanding.

It can be rewarding.

We’ve all got each other – very rarely is it lonely.

This is meant to be a bit of fun, if your offended easily – the x at the top right of the page will get you away quickest..

On the first day of christmas dispatch gave to me; a 12 lead ECG

On the second day of Christmas dispatch gave to me; a two broken gloves and a 12 Lead ECG

On the third day of Christmas dispatch gave to me; three nines dialling, two broken gloves and a 12 Lead ECG.

On the fourth day of Christmas dispatch gave to me; four relatives shouting, three nines dialling, two broken gloves and a 12 lead ECG.

On the fifth day of Christmas dispatch gave to me; five crews on meal break, four relatives shouting, three nines dialling, two broken gloves and a 12 lead ECG.

On the sixth day of Christmas dispatch gave to me; six jobs outstanding, five crews on meal break, four relatives shouting, three nines dialling, two broken gloves and a 12 lead ECG.

On the seventh day of Christmas dispatch gave to me; seven drunks fighting, six jobs outstanding, five crews on meal break, four relatives shouting, three nines dialling, two broken gloves and a 12 lead ECG.

On the eight day of Christmas dispatch gave to me; eight elderly fallers, seven drunks fighting, six jobs outstanding, five crews on meal break, four relatives shouting, three nines dialling, two broken gloves and a 12 lead ECG.

On the ninth day of Christmas dispatch gave to me; nine nurses nattering, eight elderly fallers, seven drunks fighting, six jobs outstanding, five crews on meal break, four relatives shouting, three nines dialling, two broken gloves and a 12 lead ECG.

On the tenth day of Christmas dispatch gave to me; ten police officers tasering, nine nurses nattering, eight elderly fallers, seven drunks fighting, six jobs outstanding, five crews on meal break, four relatives shouting, three nines dialling, two broken gloves and a 12 lead ECG.

On the eleventh day of Christmas dispatch gave to me; eleven firemen sleeping, ten police officers tasering, nine nurses nattering, eight elderly fallers, seven drunks fighting, six jobs outstanding, five crews on meal break, four relatives shouting, three nines dialling, two broken gloves and a 12 lead ECG.

On the 12th day of Christmas dispatch gave to me; 12 CFRs waiting, eleven firemen sleeping, ten police officers tasering, nine nurses nattering, eight elderly fallers, seven drunks fighting, six jobs outstanding, five crews on meal break, four relatives shouting, three nines dialling, two broken gloves and a 12 lead ECG.

Stay safe, and Merry Christmas.

Four Minutes

Some jobs stick around for a while; this was one of them.

It was a night shift; probably around 11pm. I was on my own on a Fast Response Vehicle; something I dont like doing at night – my imagination can be a bit wild (and so can the locals).

I was sat watching something mindless on Netflix at one of our standby points. My MDT (Mobile Data Terminal) suddenly came to life with an incident just around the corner; an unresponsive male.

I turned the lights on and turned into the road; activating my lights and sirens, my radio came to life with the dispatchers updating me with what was happening on the phone to 999 as I was responding as the call was still in progress.

“You are being dispatched to a male who is in Cardiac Arrest, CPR is in progress. We are trying to find you some backup, will update you when we allocate someone”

Sadly; this isn’t uncommon, however with full faith in our controllers – I knew it wouldn’t be far behind me.

I pulled into the residential street and could see up the road someone flagging me down – a human windmill as we refer to them in the ambulance service.

I was only just coming to a stop; pressing the “at scene” button and grabbing some gloves when my driver side door was pulled open.

“You better f***king hurry up! We have been waiting four minutes and he’s dead! Come with me quick!”

I was used to people panicking – but not used to being pulled towards a scene. I forcefully pulled myself back.

” I will come – I need to grab my equipment”

With that I went to the boot.

“Your taking the p***, my mate is dying and you won’t come in and help him!”

At this, I took a deep breath and headed towards the door.

Once inside I noticed a couple of things immediately – firstly, the smell of alcohol. It hit me. I then noticed a fire escape sign and a notice board – this was no normal residential address; but a half-way house for recent released offenders.

I was led to the living room; where a very large man laid on the floor. The manager of the institution was doing CPR, and was doing it well. As I was on my own, i said to him:

“Can you carry on; your doing a great job, and I need to get some equipment out”

With this, he stopped. Great.

“I can’t, you have to f***ing help him!”

I quickly grabbed my radio “Confirmed Cardiac Arrest, Priority backup required”

With that I put my radio down and took position by the patients head. I started compressions and waited for someone anyone who would come and give me a hand.

I am used to Cardiac Arrests; what made this different was the hostility of everyone around me. At that point I felt it. I felt alone.

Scene, Safety, Situation.

When a Paramedic, Police Officer or even a water fairy (Fireperson) arrive at an incident they assess the scene, look for things that may cause anyone any danger and then work out the situation – what a great way for me to start!

Scene

So I guess this is where I introduce myself, I am a paramedic with a few years experience who works in a busy outlying station in the UK. I am close enough to a major city to be dragged into it a lot. I work on both rapid response vehicles and as part of a double crewed ambulance. I do not have a regular crew-mate and work a range of shifts covering stupidly early mornings to stupidly late nights. I am sleep-deprived, over worked and underpaid; so in summary, an NHS Paramedic!

Safety

So as is customary, my safety always comes first. So for that reason this blog will be anonymous. My crew mates safety is always then the next priorty – so I will be using an alias for anyone who I mention working with; wether that be another Paramedic, Ambulance Assosciate Practitioner, Student Paramedic or Emergency Care Assistant. The third priority is the patients; so although everything I write about will be inspired by real incidents I have attended, all of the places, people and other identifiable information will be changed in the interests of confidentiality!

Situation

So what is the situation?

This blog is going to be a place for me to vent; to discuss cases, to talk about current topics and my practice as a Paramedic. I will be honest (sometimes too honest) about everything that I experience as a Paramedic. I decided to do this as sometimes at incidents I find myself thinking about how lucky or unlucky i am to do what I do and experience the things I do. I often find myself thinking:

You couldnt make this up

So with that in mind; im starting this. Lets see how it goes!

Stay Safe x